Nicole. 20. ENFJ. Enjoy this madness that I pass off as a coherent blog! Or whatever.
Background Illustrations provided by: http://edison.rutgers.edu/
Reblogged from lucashemmingsy  58,442 notes

thedame:

rightnowbb:

brutereason:

These are from a wonderful book called The Art Of Comforting. Check it out and learn how to be better at supporting people going through difficult things.

OH MY GOD THIS IS AMAZING I NEED THIS SKILL SO MUCH

(not that i would say the stuff on the left. but i’d probably say something useless)

This is so helpful and I am so guilty, but thank you so much for sharing this!

thestudentprincesss:

barefootdramaturg:

jewlesthemagnificent:

oldtobegin:

velveteenrabbit:

englishpracticenow:

commonly misused words - learn the proper usage of these words to get your way up to any English proficiency exams - IELTS, TOEFL, GRE, etc.

2,000 notes.

JERKING OFF TO THIS

OH GOD LESS VERSUS FEWER THANK YOU FOR ACKNOWLEDGING MY PERSONAL GRAMMATICAL VENDETTA.

By accident. On purpose. Never on accident.

ALSO, ‘amount’ and ‘number’ follow the same rules as ‘less’ and ‘fewer’, respectively. it’s not an ‘amount’ of people, it’s a number of people; by contrast, it IS an ‘amount of water’, etc.

riseofthefallenone:

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together

Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency. It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use. This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.TL;DR: It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

how romantic

riseofthefallenone:

third-round-charm:

distraction:

Not many people know the stereotypical heart shape was meant to be two hearts fused together


Hey there. History nerd here… not many people know this “fact” because it’s not true. The universal heart shape we recognize today has nothing to do with the heart, actually. It has to do with early Roman birth control.

The Romans used a plant called silphium to prevent pregnancy. It was so effective that it became a critical part of Rome’s economy and daily life. It was literally so important to their culture that the image of it’s seed were even imprinted on currency.

It’s the exact shape of the heart we know today, and this is the first time it’s visage was ever recorded in history. It was so important to them, and so highly prized that they actually drove the plant into extinction by over harvesting it for use.

This shape was so ingrained in their society’s conscious as a symbol of sexual liberation that it became associated with all aspects of intimacy, eg. sex, unity, and love.

TL;DR:
It’s not two hearts sewn together. It’s an ancient plant that Romans used to have gratuitous amounts of sex before condoms were around.

how romantic

HEY THIS BOOK IS OUT NOW YOU SHOULD BUY IT AND READ IT

willgrahamisautistic:

rklipman:

image

guys

this book is called GREAT and it’s by Sara Benincasa

and it is a contemporary retelling of THE GREAT GATSBY

with lesbians.

and i feel like you all knew about this book and none of you told me?

it’s out in april. i think we should have a preorder party, tumblr.

source

I STARTED READING IT

GUYS

ASSSSTFHNGJKNGNKDNGIOSJ04W9